Idiomatic English means Brits struggle to communicate with the world

(Reading time: 2 - 4 minutes)

It's a theory which is bound to put the cat among the pigeons. 


The british are proud of the idiomatic humour of their language. But an academic has argued that they are actually falling behind because they insist on using phrases that the rest of the world does not understand. 
Professor Jennifer Jenkins, chair of Global Englishes at the University of Southampton, says that people who speak English as a first language are bad at changing their speech to suit non-native speakers, meaning they struggle to be understood. 
The divide means those who speak English as a second language speak it very differently to native speakers - and the two groups are increasingly unable to understand each other, she argues. 


Native speakers are also unwilling to make allowances for others by changing their speech patterns or slowing them down - meaning they struggle to socialise with non-native speakers who are better able to communicate with each other in English than they are with the British. 


The dynamic means the two groups could be unable to understand each other in as little as a decade - putting native speakers at a disadvantage with the rest of the world. Her research has included speaking to students on Erasmus programmes, which allow students from different EU countries to study abroad. 


In one case she interviewed Hungarian, German and Italian students who said they could speak to each other with perfect ease but only had trouble when a native English speaker joined the conversation. 
“It’s seen as a sort of laziness, as an arrogance, people seem to think that people are unwilling to make the effort” she said.


In another case, interviews with 34 PhD non-British students who spoke English revealed that they struggled to understand their British counterparts who “didn’t make any allowances for the fact that they came from a different language, they spoke very very fast, used very idiomatic language and joked a lot.” she said. 


The theory appears in a new book, “Languages After Brexit”, as part of an essay in which Professor Jenkins argues that native English speakers are worse at communicating clearly than people who have it as a second language. 
She cites one case where an interviewer on BBC Radio 3 asks Italian opera singer Roberto Alagna whether his trip to London was “going swimmingly”. 


“It was clear that Alagna did not have any idea of what this opaque idiom meant, and the interviewer, after an uncomfortable pause, realised this and asked instead ‘Is it going well?’” the article says. 


Another interviewer, a Channel 4 news presenter who was bilingual, asked the then French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron how he would challenge the country›s rightward move by asking «So how would you buck that trend?» leaving Macron confused. 


“While in both cases, the interviewer, especially the second one, was able to paraphrase fairly speedily (which is by no means always the case), these two anecdotes demonstrate that native speakers who have experience of speaking English with non-natives, and even those who have other languages, may find it problematic to adjust spontaneously away from their local use of English,” Professor Jenkins adds. 


She argues that the dynamic is causing a divide as other countries see the English as aloof because they insist on using their own language instead of learning others.
“It’s seen as a sort of laziness, as an arrogance, people seem to think that the British are unwilling to make the effort,” she said. 


English as spoken by foreign countries is also developing new grammar rules which are seen as incorrect by native speakers but are valued abroad because they are logical and efficient. 
For example, nouns which do not become plural in native English, such as “feedback” or “information”, are made plural by foreign speakers into “feedbacks” or “informations”. 


Source: telegraph.co.uk (2017/12/14)

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